Budapest Week One: First Impressions

Budapest Week One: First Impressions

adventures of andrea

I’ve had a bit of a lifestyle change since I last checked in here on the blog: I’ve arrived in Budapest, Hungary to study abroad for the semester! This past week has felt like a whirlwind, and I’m excited to share it all with you.

Upon arriving last Sunday (one week ago), I was jetlagged, exhausted, and overwhelmed. So many unknowns faced me, which was simultaneously exciting and stressful. Upon arriving at the airport, I met my lovely tandem partner (a student from Hungary who is here to help me along the way). I began unpacking in the dorm, met my roommates, and explored the city for a bit that night. My friends and I found a small pizza place only 3 minutes from my dorm selling huge slices of pizza priced at less than $1 each!! I have a feeling we’ll be visiting this place a lot…

As I…

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Americans are rejecting the ‘homeschool myth’ — and experts say the misunderstood education might be better than public or charter schools

Americans are rejecting the ‘homeschool myth’ — and experts say the misunderstood education might be better than public or charter schools

Happy. Homeschooling. Housewife.

When I saw the title of this article I knew I needed to read it — and I am glad I did! Most of my friends are educators working as leaders in public and charter schools. A few of them have even started their own schools. All are seriously committed  to the awesome task of educating our children.  But I have noticed something over the years, and that is that there is lack of curiosity regarding what home schoolers are doing and how they are doing it.  I am hardly asked by my educator friends (or even parents of children who are traditionally schooled) how our experience is as a home schooling family – the good and the bad. And this ‘lack of curiosity’ could be for a number of reasons–maybe they are simply uncomfortable to bring the topic up. Whatever the reason, I am a firm believer that you…

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The Problem with Being an ‘Overachiever’

The Problem with Being an ‘Overachiever’

There is no such thing as an “overachiever” – just jealous “underachievers” trying to throw shade.

Alexis Chateau

I was called an overachiever for the first time in 2015 – and by another woman.The remark came after a discussion of childhood schooling,where she measured her son’s track record against my own.

The remark caught me completely by surprise. What did it mean exactly? Is there something wrong with personal success? Am I supposed tolower my standards? Work less hard? Set fewer goals?

Was it because I am a woman?

Achievement in Jamaica

pexels-photo-160058

Prior to moving to the United States, I don’t remember ever hearing the word ‘overachiever’. In Jamaica, you’re either hardworking, or lazy – gender be damned!

In Jamaica, it’s also common for femalesto excel in school – more so than males. We also outnumber them in college classrooms; and then outnumber them again in most areas of the work force; and have a much higher literacy rate.

According to expert sources, like the American Psychology…

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